hearing myself through silence

Following a bit of a lull in my posting, I’m back to write about the Silent Retreat I recently attended. 

Welcome to Noosfera! Our keys and welcome notes


So here I was, on a Friday evening, beholding the dazzlingly white full moon, surrounded by the black silhouettes of vast mountains, caressed by an icy alpine breeze, with an orange cat called Paprika curled in my lap, hearing the sound of… howling wolves?! At first I thought it might be a tribe of inebriated youngsters possessed by the lunatic spirit at a nearby village, but later it was confirmed to me that jackals roam free on the mountaintops. I had just finished a gentle, grounding and refreshingly awakening evening yoga class, the first of several to take place during a weekend retreat organised by Athens-based yoga teacher Tina Myntz Zymaraki. Only minutes before I had embarked on my journey into a silence that was to last until Sunday afternoon. We had each selected an Osho card from a pack that was to act as a message to set our awareness on, and before delving into non-talking we went around the circle saying our name and one intent we had during the weekend. Mine was Kindness, but by the end, I got Gratitude instead.

Other participants walked by beaming “good evening!” smiles on their way to the dining hall in the super-elegant Noosfera main house, and feeling a rumble in my tummy I decided to follow suit. Decorated in a neo-traditional English country style that soothes both eye and spirit, the living room/dining room area was imbued by silence, and all I could hear was the sound of the flames dancing in the fireplace and cutlery delicately clanging on plates. A woman in her 50s who was clearly there with her bestie was cracking up so much she ran out of the room with her hands over her mouth to stifle her giggles as her friend cried (silently of course) with laughter into her soup. This would take some getting used to.

As we feasted on creamy pumpkin soup and crunchy croutons followed by a mountain of quinoa, lentil, orange and fresh herb salad and toasted wholewheat pitta bread with hummus, my fellow silence-vowers and I avoided eye contact with each other, as Tina had encouraged us to. The Silent Retreat aims to encourage actually immersing yourself deeper into your being by disengaging from the outside world, she told us, not simply zipping your mouth and throwing away the key. Being a slightly anxious mother I carried my phone with me but not for an instant was I tempted to enter the world of the internet – in fact, the mere idea of social medialising even as a voyeur revolted me.

On the scene as a yoga teacher for around 17 years, Tina is only one of two individuals in Greece who organizes silent retreats, and was inspired by her own experiences at the Ananda Ashram in New York, where she lived for a while: “The idea was very attractive to me, especially as I interact with others a lot,” she said, “so as of 2010 I started introducing small periods of silence in my weekend retreats. Over time, those periods were extended, and I started to organize semi-silent retreats. Students always told me how valuable the experience proved for them, so over the past three years I’ve been indulging them in silence more and more.” (See the end of this article to find out about Tina’s upcoming retreat).
Let me set the scene of where I was before telling you how my own journey into silence unfolded. Noosfera Centre, built especially for wellness and holistic retreat workshops of all varieties, is located in the Peloponnesian mountains, near Xylokastro. Arriving in the dark, I couldn’t yet see the magnificent views that delighted me the following morning – mountains carpeted in thick greenery, smoky valleys, patches of traditional villages here and there, a gleaming snowy peak and a relieving (for us sea aficionados) strip of blue in the distance.

Give me a window unto nature so I may witness myself

Noosfera is a new generation holistic hideaway, lovingly created five years ago by journalist-turned-author (of six books, including the bestseller Mystic Odyssey) and therapist Ioulia Pitsouli and psychologist/psychotherapist Maria Xifara, who live here for half a week throughout the year, as holistic wellness and psychology seminars of all varieties take place. The main house and accommodations are all built in low wooden cottages decorated in a rustic yet modern style, with accessories like fluffy Guy Laroche towels and flocculent duvets. The choice of space for this particular retreat was a very carefully made one on Tina’s part, as she felt it was important for participants to enjoy creature comforts while making sense of silence – many silent retreats around the world are held in far more monastic, daunting circumstances in order to strip away distractions.

I’d longed to try a silent retreat for many years, so I jumped at the chance to do so when this workshop came up. The concept was to spend two days doing our best at staying schtum and combining that with soothing yet not undemanding yogic practice. On the morning of the second day, we participated in a more energetic class aimed at connecting us to our core. As I have been facing some challenging personal issues lately, halfway through the class I retreated into child’s pose when I started feeling it was getting too demanding for me. Something in me was pissed off and simply refused to carry on. As I curled up on my mat I felt a wave of sadness rise up from the depths of my heart, and pour out through my eyes in tears. I was about to do my usual stoical routine, to tell myself to put the ‘self-pity’ aside and get on with the practice, when I remembered that this was not that kind of class, nor was that kind of class that I need in my life. If I had been in a different state of mind I would have cherished the upbeat challenge, but at that moment I couldn’t find it in me to push myself any further when I’ve felt I’ve been squeezed enough in other areas of my existence. So I got up and walked out, feeling fully supported in doing so. 

Yoga teacher Tina Myntz Zymaraki

Later in the day, we got to enjoy a different kind of class based on restorative asanas and self-care, an aspect of yoga practice that Tina has dedicated many years to develop. As a former Ashtanga devotee, she has over the years realized the vital significance of listening to her own changing body and treating it with love and respect, rather than forcing it through a sequence that has caused her several injuries along the way, despite how much discipline and caution she applied to following the rules. “For the last 150 years, yoga practices have been centred on young male students, but in the west, the average class is made up of women, many of them in their early to late middle age,” she notes.


“For several years I have focused on studying and practising bio-mechanics and human anatomy, aiming to help my students work from the inside out to enhance strength and suppleness by listening to their own unique needs,” Tina explained. “I take on a more innovative approach that is not strictly bound to classic prototypes but instead can be adapted by students so that they reap all the benefits of yoga without straying from their sense of self. As my favourite teacher, Richard Freeman says, ‘yoga begins with listening” – listening to your own needs. It’s your body, your time, your choice, your yoga. Yogis have always been anarchists and revolutionaries so why should you go to a class and obey what you are told if it feels wrong to you or causes you pain?” she points out. The Self-Care class was my absolute favourite because that was exactly what I needed in combination with the inner and outer quiet. First, we were shown how to use a tennis ball to massage our feet, necks, shoulders and back in the most blissful tension-releasing tennis fun I could ever conceive of. Next, we lay down (but were asked to make every effort to stay awake) for a mesmerising Yoga Nidra session in which Tina guided our awareness across every inch of our body with her softly spoken words. When at some point she said “and now move your awareness to your fifth finger,” I anticipated she would next guide us to our sixth; that’s when I realized how incredibly relaxed I was.

The location and the practice of silence offered us all the golden opportunity to take time for ourselves while feeling warmly united in a rare experience. I relished the chance to stretch and breathe as well as read inspiring books (one day I read half a book lying by the fire – it might be a decade since the last time I did that!), go for nature walks overlooking spanning views of natural landscapes, play with an overenthusiastic spaniel who had an endless supply of cones to be chased, and to write, write, write (my child-like sense for writing was reignited and I wrote throughout my time there. On actual paper. Using a pen.). And then there was the deep sleep that highly oxygenated alpine air bequeaths.

My favourite spot at Noosfera

On the first night, I experienced an amusing moment when I realized how useless it was to try communicating at all. After cuddling Paprika the cat I realized my jacket was pretty stinky; she’s adorable but I’d assumed that as she belongs to such a pristine place she’d be sweet-smelling, perhaps with a fragrance like the rooms we stayed in, named lavender, spearmint, pomegranate, or would have a natural Liberty’s fragrance. But no such luck, so I decided to air my jacket on the terrace in the room I was sharing with two girls, who were sitting there at the time. For some reason I bravely ventured to wordlessly re-enact why I was hanging it out to air- first I pretended to be Paprika, with the catwalk, swooshing tail (my arm), pointy ears and alert eyes, then re-enacted myself cuddling her, then smelling my malodorous jacket and looking shocked thus needing to air it. They looked at me and laughed, and I had no idea whether they thought they were rooming with a madwoman or had understood even a tad from my charades. It was at that moment that I resolutely decided that as amusing as it could be (especially for others!) it was probably best to do away with voiceless social banter.

Colouring INwards

The second and final night, there was another moment of hilarity when the waitress walked ceremoniously across the room holding a tray with a single collonaded glass of rose wine that one of the participants had ordered, with everyone turning to stare, many of us feeling a mixed emotion between empathy (silence brings stuff up, wine might help), confusion (wine is fun when you’re talking) and envy (why didn’t I think of that?), much to the embarrassment of the participant who had ordered it. After dinner many of us selected a mandala design to colour in and sat around the fire on the floor for hours bringing them to life – I hadn’t felt that way since I was seven, at school, hearing only the incessant sound of colouring pencils on paper.

Our silence was broken on Sunday afternoon, with a sharing circle during which we each related our experiences. There were tears. There was laughter. This was followed by a conversation-friendly lunch, after which we all posed for a few photographs together (below) and went our separate ways.

As Bjork once said, “It’s Oh So Quiet!” Shhhhh

I felt reinvigorated, rested, and subtly yet profoundly changed as a result, like I had learned a secret that had been in me all along. More and more research is being done on the benefits of silence, and a recent Finnish study revealed that it actively enhances brain and emotional health: “The scientists discovered that when the mice were exposed to two hours of silence per day they developed new cells in the hippocampus. The hippocampus is a region of the brain associated with memory, emotion and learning.”

I was also relieved that the nightmare scenario I had self-deprecatingly envisioned before going there, that my cheeky monkey brain would take over and I’d be constantly trying to shut out my restless mental chatter, didn’t happen even for an instant. In fact, I found myself observing and feeling everything more intensely; I savoured food with greater pleasure (I did notice I was eating more than usual, perhaps to fill the ‘gap’ of not using my mouth to spout out conversational gems), became more aware of my body and movement – from ease and flexibility to tightness and restriction, rested in the enhanced clarity and calm of my head. “Silence offers us a different kind of quality in our thought processes and how we relate to others,” Tina said. “It offers us the opportunity to respond rather than react. So I see it as a natural extension of the yoga practice.” There were uncomfortable moments too, at some point I felt as though I was at an airport with a delayed flight hanging around and waiting. Not wanting my young son to feel I’d fallen off the face of the earth, I spoke to him on the phone for a few brief moments as I sat on the park bench facing the mountains and sea. “I love you, I love you, I love you!” he squeaked. And after I put my phone away I felt literally engulfed by the silence of the mountains in a way I’d never experienced before. I yearned for him, worried for him as if he lived in another world. Then I looked at the sea yearned to fly across the valleys to it like the birds swooping around. I wanted to lie in the grass. I was dreamy and tranquil yet felt vulnerable, detached and alone at once.

The author settling into Warrior II with a view

I returned to the endless fracas of Athens renewed, feeling as if I’d connected with a new awareness in myself, one that comes from even 24 full hours of silent observation. Being surrounded by others who also don’t talk was divine because I realised that every word you hear around you instantly registers as a thought or emotion in the mind, even if it has nothing to do with you. So I have vowed to stay away from other people’s conversations if I’m craving peace. Like most of the others, I felt I could have stayed a little longer, and was a little rough to have to return to reality. Yet fortunately, silence is free and can be found everywhere, especially within. All you need to do is commit to it, tune in, and hey presto, you’re there.

 

TINA’s UPCOMING SILENT RETREAT (21 & 22 April)

Mountain Refuge Silent Yoga
A little before summer seduces us to her shores, join Tina for two days combining a few of her favourite things: yoga, cooking, silence and nature. Experience the joy and stillness which emerge effortlessly when we spend time on the mountain and its stunning vistas… (click for more info)

gateway to consciousness

There are a multitude of ways to seek – and find – consciousness. From its very beginning, humankind has sought to enhance and explore consciousness, which can be described as a state in which one achieves a heightened awareness of the world within and around oneself. When businessman and radio professional Robert Monroe began his experimentation with consciousness in earnest during the 1950s, experiencing out-of-body experiences and heightened, multifaceted states of waking consciousness, he began sharing them via books with the wider public, and trying out various forms of audio technology for those purposes.  He eventually developed the Hemi-Sync© audio technology that is used worldwide today, while also setting up The Monroe Institute. Hemi-Sync© has been tested on tens of thousands of people and been shown to offer a multitude of health benefits, chiefly because it synchronises the left and right brain hemispheres and creating new neuronal pathways, basically re-wiring the brain. From much improved concentration and memory retention to emotional and psychological healing (from anxiety, depression, phobias, trauma), heightened intuition, improvement of overall physical health or of specific ailments, alleviating ADD and PTSD, and even helping people to realign with their true life purpose by connecting with their inner truth, its well-researched effects have been nothing but positive. On a more metaphysical level, Hemi-Sync© has also proven as a powerful tool for having Out of Body Experiences (OBE) and delving into other realms beyond the physical.


Greece is the only country in Europe where there is a centre with rooms using advanced audio technology modeled on that of the Monroe Institute (TMI) for the purpose of Hemi-Sync© workshops. Noosfera Wellness & Retreat Centre, located near Xylokastro in the Peloponnese, is run by a psychologist Maria Xifara and a former journalist, Ioulia Pitsouli. It hosts a broad variety of alternative wellness-related retreats throughout the year, and annually hosts The Gateway Voyage, a six-day intensive experience of TMI’s Hemi-Sync© binaural beat meditations (see my Skype interview with Linda Leblanc, who facilitates the course at the bottom, of the page).


I am planning to visit Noosfera Centre in just a few weeks for a Silence Retreat that includes yoga, walks in nature and art, so I will be reporting on my first-hand experience of the place – watch this space!

 

INTERVIEW WITH IOULIA PITSOULI, co-owner
of Noosfera Wellness & Retreat Center

 

Ioulia Pitsouli
Maria Xifara

Alexia Amvrazi: Can you please tell me about yourself, and what has brought you to the healing and wellness field?
Ioulia Pitsouli: I met Maria Xifara as we were on the same path, one that both of us walked along on for decades. We both had a bright inner flame burning in us both as we sought answers on life’s purpose and consciousness expansion. We traveled around many countries, attending workshops by various spiritual teachers. We ended up – Maria as a psychologist and me as a journalist (and later author) – developing an integrative approach that encapsulates the spiritual psychology of A Course in Miracles with Greek philosophy and mythology. In this integration we found a powerful healing tool that we have shared in spiritual psychology groups and workshops over the last 20 years.

AA: How did you create Noosfera? How would you describe it?
IP: Noosfera Center reflects our personal need for a seminar space that, unlike impersonal hotels or makeshift, uncomfortable ascetic cells, stands out because of our personal touch. It has the “air” of a boutique hotel but actually is a purposely built complex of wooden cottages especially created for self-awareness, yoga and recreational events focused on spiritual development. The idea is to offer body, mind, spirit wellness-centred weekends, or weeklong anti-stress and self-expansion retreats.

Exterior at Noosfera Wellness Center & Retreat

We believe that the person who seeks peace, joy and truth about himself will also be inspired by the beauty of the mountains and the sea in the horizon that surround our land, and by the rugged charm of the area itself. We wish for our visitors, in parallel to the expansion of their consciousness, to feel pampered and draw joy from details such as the lavender under the sleeping pillows, the freshly fragrant rooms or the “structured” fine water and the organic vegetables coming from our own garden.

AA: Noosfera is the only place in Europe that is decked out with the appropriate audio equipment for the Gateway Voyage and other audio-healing-related workshops. What did it involve to set that up?
IP: We were inspired by The Monroe Institute in the USA. Being facilitators of  The Μonroe Institute in Greece we decided to include in the construction of Noosfera’s buildings the proper technological set-up. With the help of highly skilled sound technicians we managed to wire all the rooms with special audio equipment. Thus we can offer our guests the privilege of listening through headphones for meditation or lucid dreaming exercises while they are comfortably lying in the privacy of their room.

Noosfera has developed a community vibe, with visitors returning regularly and some even setting up homes nearby

AA: Linda Leblanc mentioned that at Noosfera there is a “spiritual community”. Could you please elaborate on this?
IP: We strongly believe that we are much more than our physical bodies so we gladly support workshops, given by us or others, facilitating people to have personal experiences of their spiritual self and their inner splendour. Forgiveness, is also among our core interests. During the 5 years that Noosfera Center has existed, like- minded people have been drawn here and, wanting to share and participate in our vision, are building cottages near Noosfera Center, gradually creating a spiritual community of sorts.

AA: Do you live there & run courses and workshops year round? What kind of events take place there?
IP: The first half of the week we are in Athens running psychology groups, and from Thursday to Sunday we are at Noosfera running our own workshops or supporting groups who come for their programs as Noosfera Center is also open to groups that would like to host their activities. Yoga workshops, Silent retreats, Tai Chi and Holotropic Breathing workshops, A Course in Miracles and The Monroe Institute’s programs are among the activities taking place every week, year round. Alternative summer vacations and Christmas / New Year holistic retreats are also among the highly enjoyed programs offering warmth, self realization and new friendships to the participants. Noosfera thus offers meaningful “escapes” from the city and limited ideas of self and life!

 

Interview with Gateway Voyage Facilitator Linda Leblanc

greece’s modern father of homeopathy

Last stop on the ferry line heading into the sunset from Volos off towards the Northern Sporades islands lays Alonissos, an unspoilt, pine-cloaked island. This unique destination chiefly draws visitors who come to swim in its clean emerald waters, dine on langoustines, walk on its many forest paths and visit the rare Mediterranean Monk seal, at the National Marine Park as it’s one of the few remaining habitats of this endangered species.  

Alonissos is home to the beautiful National Marine Park where the Monachus Monachus monk seals live

Alonissos attracts a regular gathering of multicultural visitors for a completely different reason too: as we drove around the Milia area five kilometres from the port town of Patitiri, we were intrigued by the stream of atypical tourists walking along the sides of the road with great purpose in the midday sun. There were women clad in a saris, east Asian ladies holding paper sun umbrellas, northern Europeans dressed quite formally rather that the usual T-shirt and shorts. Soon the mystery was solved when we discovered that these small groups were in fact all doctors who come the island to attend courses at the International Academy of Classical Homeopathy. Yes, it turned out that apart from seals, delectable dinners and lush nature, Alonissos is also home to the only institution in the world that’s dedicated exclusively to the teaching of Homeopathic Medicine.

Doctors from around the world attending Dr Vithoulkas’ Homeopathy Academy course      

The Academy is directed by the multi-awarded and highly recognised Professor George Vithoulkas, and opened its doors in the early 1990s. We had heard about the internationally acclaimed Greek homeopath and the Alternative Nobel Prize (Right Livelihood Award) he was honoured with in 1996 ‘for upgrading Classical Homeopathy to the standard of a science’, and being fans of complementary medicines we rushed to visit the Academy and ask for an appointment with the professor himself.

Professor George Vithoulkas at his desk in the Academy of Homeopathy on Alonissos

Mind you, it wasn’t easy, as the professor is extremely busy year round. Apart from his courses and seminars, which take place at the Academy as well as online, he also writes books and records lectures that go to universities far and wide in the world. In the past the professor would travel to the universities where he taught, but he now prefers to remain more settled on his beloved island of Alonissos, where lives year-round, apart from attending important international conferences where he is regularly invited to talk.

The illustrious homeopath is a real legend on the island, where everyone speaks of him with awe and respect, and his reputation transmits to medical communities and not only, worldwide. He was a major protagonist in the resurgence of classical homeopathy after WWII, and continues to strive for the better understanding, use and acceptance of homeopathy in our modern age.

After applying for an interview with the professor by fax, we decided to visit the large stone Academy building and peruse its lovely tranquil grounds and the reference library, where one can buy some of Vithoulka’s most famous books such as ‘The Science of Homeopathy’, ‘Materia Medica Viva’, ‘Classic Homeopathy for Anxiety and Jealousy’, ‘A new Model For Health and Disease’ and ‘Homeopathy – Medicine for the New Millenium’ in Greek and in English. It was there that we had the great luck to bump into the Professor himself and introduce ourselves in person. He was friendly and accommodating, and agreed to an interview, which is something he rarely does because of his lack of free time. He offered us plenty of additional background material for our research, showing his no-nonsense efficiency and professionalism, and kindly invited us to visit him at his organic farm villa a couple of days later.

When we arrived at the picturesque location, set away from the road on a hillside covered by pine forests, we were most fascinated to see a red electric car parked in the driveway, and Professor Vithoulkas told us how he had been offered this vehicle as a gift by a German doctor at an international conference. This is only one example of the devotion shown to him by his students and colleagues; the entire, very elegant lecture theatre at the Academy was a gift from a Greek heart surgeon. The car, just like his very home, which is surrounded by olive, plum and apricot trees loaded with plump fruits, sheep grazing the nearby fields, turkeys making a commotion and the deep blue sea sparkling in the background, truly represents his life philosophy of living with awareness and esteem towards the environment, the society, as well as oneself. Nibbling on a plate of freshly-picked apricots, we comfortably began our conversation.

IMVTY: What brought you Alonissos?

GV: I came here in the late sixties to seek out a man whom I had been told was very wise. I found him and we talked; he asked me what I did, and I thought to myself oh here I go again, I will have to explain what homeopathy is to a shepherd, but as soon as I told him he looked at me and gave me an excellent definition, in fact I think it was the precise definition that is in the Encyclopedia Britannica. It turned out that this shepard was extremely knowledgeable, he probably had a photographic memory, but he was not particularly wise.  On the bright side I really liked Alonissos, so I eventually bought this land and have gradually made it my home.

Do you live here all year round?

GV: Yes for a long time now, I used to travel a great deal all round the world you know, teaching and lecturing and currently I am a professor at the Kiev Medical Academy, Medical Faculty of the Basque University in Spain, and the University of Medicine in Moscow, but I do not travel much any more so I do my courses by video mostly. But this has been my base for years, and we therefore built the International Academy of Classical Homeopathy here on Alonissos.

You teach only qualified medical doctors and dentists at your school. Why is that?

GV: Yes.  My aim is to provide these official health specialists and practitioners with a very powerful tool with which to combat or prevent disease and to help their patients get well……. and homeopathy is very difficult to learn, even more so than medicine.  With the growth of homeopathy as a successful method, people are no longer suspicious about it; however there are many charlatan practitioners and teachers who are appearing to fill a need since there are too few properly qualified homeopaths… It is my strong belief that homeopathy’s eventual downfall could occur mainly due to a number of “creative distortions” that are injected into the main body of knowledge by the “imagination” and “projections” of some “modern teachers’ of homeopathy.

Since many of our students are receptive to such myths and stories concocted by flights of wild imagination, many so-called teachers have risen to fill this gap. Believe it or not, there is a Berlin Wall remedy! And some teach that if you look like an animal you need an animal-based remedy; others go so far as to think that if you write the potency and name of the remedy on the bottle, it instills the given attributes (he chuckles in disbelief). After many years of work we have finally managed to create a Postgraduate Degree for medical students to learn homeopathy in the University of the Aegean, based in Syros.

But do you believe that only qualified doctors should be able to learn and practice homeopathy?

GV: No not at all, although this is my policy. I believe that after proper 4-5 year training in a good homeopathy school, any qualified individual may practice.

 

Although millions of people swear by it, there is no scientific evidence proving that homeopathy works.

In your opinion, what lies behind the British Medical Association’s claim in England in 2010 that homeopathy should be cut from the National Health Service, since it is an unproven science?
GV: As I mentioned earlier there are unfortunately some practitioners who are not properly qualified and also some who make claims that are just not based on reality, for instance – that homeopathy can be used as a form of vaccine for epidemic – which is simply not true as every individual needs a different homeopathic remedy specific to their case. So these claims bring the entire practice into dispute.

That’s one of the reasons; the other is that homeopathy is becoming the medicine of the new millennium, so doctors and especially pharmaceutical companies (with multimillion dollar profits) are feeling very threatened (homeopathy is non-chemical and inexpensive), so this is why they attack homeopathy. It is not coincidental to note, however, that countless medical doctors who were asked to examine the principles and effectiveness of homeopathy, on seeing the results and learning more, have become staunch supporters of this method.

What is your main advice for healthy living?

GV: Basically it revolves around one word – cleanliness. Your conscience is the most important thing to keep clean, but so are the body and mind. Health in the physical body is freedom from pain.  But if you don’t have pain is that health? No, you need something else in order to say somebody is healthy – and that is having well being as a general state. But many mentally ill individuals can have strong bodies – a lot of energy, so therefore the definition has to also address the psyche (the emotional part).

Thus, “healthy people” are those who are not overtaken by any passion – the concept of pathos is based on that idea which overtakes and makes a slave the soul (our emotional part). If you are living in the serene state, with freedom from passion, in a state of calm, that is a dynamic state. I feel that I enjoy that state but I do not become a slave to anything.

And this leads to the soul – the soul has to be free from selfishness, from ego.  Once you achieve this there is an inner click and you enter the world of ideas. The ideas of a selfless man help humanity, while the ideas of a selfish man destroy others. Even in disease there can be harmony. I believe this is the ideal to work towards.

A healthy individual is one who is creative, with a double purpose, firstly to help himself, but at the same time being creative and giving to the society, and this the society is equally benefited by what has been created.

Meeting Professor Vithoulkas was indeed a pleasure, for we felt that we discovered the man behind the big name – an individual who has dedicated a 45 year career in which he has personally treated over 170 thousand patients, many of them prominent personalities from the fields of culture and politics throughout the world, such as Indian philosopher Krishnamurti, whose side he stood by for many years as his personal homeopath, and former Greek premier Andreas Papandreou).

Above all, as he confirmed to us himself in our discussion, his life has been about a challenging and important mission, to reverse thinking processes that prefer the use of pharmaceuticals over treating the individual holistically, to educate not only the elite but also the masses about the power of nature – and of man himself – to heal, as a process that involves the mind, body and spirit, and to offer, as he put it, “powerful tools” to those who have the position, expertise, clarity of intention and intelligence to use them effectively. Such is a mission that requires serious responsibility and commitment, but also reveals a larger, more valiant hope for humankind.

Interview by Adrian Vrettos and Alexia Amvrazi
As first published in www.greektravel.com

going with the inner flow

Early last month I attended a workshop presented by Dr. Dwaine Hartman at a beautiful space in central Athens – Inner Flow. I  felt refreshed by the aesthetic of the space, which was nothing like the usual New Agey centres one comes across too often – with golden buddhas and spirals at every turn, the air thick with the smell of Nag Champa incense and cat-hair on a dated armchair (ok that was just creative freedom on my part, but you get the picture). Inner Flow is urban, post-industrial with an upbeat vibe and glossy details – a polished ultra-modern kitchen, two bathrooms with luxurious products (including fragrant hand cream, always deserving of serious appreciation), and a fluffy light grey carpet that incites in one the desire to roll around. Beyond the elegant surroundings, the space feels highly professional and deeply comforting at once, and it’s not by chance, because the person who owns and runs it, Effie Adamidou, has those exact qualities herself. She is fully centred on her professional objectives as a Systemic Psychotherapist who works one-on-one with clients as well as organizing a variety of workshops featuring her own teachings and those of excellent therapists from abroad. Yet at the same time she is so warm and effusive that having a cup of tea (organic of course) and chocolate (one of the soul-soothing treats visitors regularly bring for fellow sufferers/evolvers) with her in the kitchen makes you feel right at home.

Inner Flow has already welcomed some great events and there are many more in the works. Here, Adamidou talks about how she started out and how she slowly transformed Inner Flow into what it is today, as well as what her plans are for the coming year.

“My practice began in the Psychiatric Hospital of Attica, in the Drug Rehabilitation Centre “ 18 Ano” doing Creative Arts therapy – Empowerment & Counseling group work . I was about to go to New York (where she grew up and lived until the age of 12), and continue my studies there, but everything here just started rolling so I stayed & went with the Flow!! I was studying & did trainings in systemic – family psychotherapy, drama therapy, dance therapy, music therapy & also body psychotherapy – Wilhelm Reich Institute -Vegeotherapy & Character Analysis here in Greece. I was also a specialist in Drug Prevention going to schools in Piraeus and the local community & working with children adolescents , teachers, parents , as well as in the Drug rehabilitation program “ Atrapos” for adolescents . For many years I have worked as a psychotherapist at a private center “ Paidi & Oikogeneia” – for children & parents & with distinguished psychotherapists doing group work & workshops in their private offices. At the same time , I had my private practice on the side. I love working in groups where we all are together and can expand , learning and supporting each other. I never had the dream of being in an office behind a desk or something, I love being on the floor, moving around, using various props, doing experiential workshops!

From a very young age, from 1997, I was very fortunate to be surrounded by very beautiful and very experienced therapists and healers and people specialised in holistic techniques and yoga. From early childhood I was also very open to Energy – recognising that there is more than what we see and read in books. Both my parents were very open to a holistic way of seeing life and my godfather, who was very into esotericism, played a big role in helping me develop my way of seeing things. In my youth I studied theatre too – the Stanislavsky Method with Helen Scotes and always had teachers who made a very big difference and influenced me very positively from college. I was never really drawn to classical approaches, despite having studied many of them, what interested me most and made my heart beat loudly, was working with innovative ways of personal development & going beyond conventions!

“Since 2006, I stopped working so actively in the various programs & centers & decided I wanted to create my own space. I never stopped the collaborations I’d had with therapists, running experiential therapy workshops, but I knew it was time to create something more solid of my own. Soon I created Inner Flow Athens City Centre For Psychological Support& Creative Expression and Spiritual Awakening – I know, it’s a long title, but that’s what we do here! People think there are a lot of people running it but it’s only me (laughs). My upbringing in New York has given me a precious gift that I’m open to people of all kinds and from different paradigms. In 2009 I created Inner Flow in Holargos in the northern part of Attica, continuing one to one sessions ,group therapy & workshops – “ Inner Child” , “ Women& Femininity”, “ & many others combining techniques & methods of Energy healing – Reiki- Roizon- Bioenergy- The Healing Codes, Soul- Body Fusion , meditation & of course creative arts therapy , body psychotherapy & Systemic Constellation Work.

Systemic Psychotherapy is not to be confused with Bert Hellinger’s Systemic Constellation work . It is field of Psychotherapy as Psychoanalysis, Rogerian, Gestalt, Existential etc… We focus first on the person- the client – connecting their mind, body, spirit, and then all the ripple circles around that individual – the immediate family, friends, colleagues and neighbours etc and going all the way to the universe. We work on the stories, family patterns, trans -generational schemes , the perceptions & imprints on all levels. It’s important to be in the here and now, so in systemic therapy we always connect to the past by bringing it to the present in a meaningful transformational way.

“In 2012 it all expanded – more people were interested in holistic work and Inner Flow became more of a scene. In 2016 I came to the heart of Athens, thanks to my beloved parents , where I’ve created Inner Flow Athens City Centre. I’ve always been very connected to the energy of Athens from a little girl so this was the ideal location, and this way people can reach Inner Flow much easier.

Many years now I collaborate & also organize seminars , workshops & trainings with teachers & therapists from abroad. Among them are Barrie Musgrave- Systemic Energy Constellation Work, Elizabeth Ann Morris – Spiritual Teacher & Healer, former principal of Diana Cooper Foundation Yorgos Nasios – Certified trainer of “Walking in Your Shoes “, which combines Systemic Constellation work & the Arts. Kaypacha – Tom Lescher- Astrologer, Spiritual practitioner, Roel Fredrix- Shamanism, Energy Medicine & Healing  in the Inca Tradition, David Kennet- Sound Healer , Vibrational Resonance & Brain Gym practitioner, Margo Awanata- Facilitator , trainer in Woman’s Empowerment circles & Retreats, and Co – Founder & Trainer of “ Wild Sisters”

In Greece Inner Flow is connected & collaborates with “brother-spaces ” & teachers , promoting a holistic approach to personal development & spiritual awakening – Some of these are : “ Guru Ram Das Ashram- Kundalini Yoga” with Amar Dev Marina Ktisti , “Be Fluid” – Zhineng Qigong- Chryssi Berou , “The Senteris Method “  with Master Panagiotis Senteris, Philosophical Association “Peaceful Warrior”,  Leda Shantala’s “Shantom – House of Culture, the Angels Nest – Energy Healing, Ioanna Athanasiou, Center for Systemic Psychotherapy & Counseling with Smaro Markou Tsangaraki
& Wilhelm Reich Institute of Greece’s “Vegeotherapy & Character Analysis” .

“Inner Flow is a place where people can come to be at peace and expand. The space is not only me – it has developed a life of its own, and when people come here they see it, sense it, know it. It’s also a lot to do with the people & collaborators who come here , that’s why I am particular about who I bring over, and what they do when they’re here – We are a Community each an important part of the sacred circle. This place is a portal and those who come here have heard a calling. I feel very responsible for this space, that it should offer people what they need to walk their path in love, truth and integrity, opening them up to their divinity. This is how we can make a change in this world, supporting Gaia our beloved planet, being connected to the mysteries & gifts of the universe! All in the Light…!”

 

ikaria’s new age appeal

What was a resilient but relatively unknown corner of Greece has over the past few years flourished into a holistic wellness destination. Yoga retreats, wellness workshops, energy-healing therapies, organic food and natural cosmetics have now become increasingly accessible island-wide.

Various spaces, such as the Agriolykos Pension in Therma, are also planning more such retreats and workshops to be held next year, and say that there is definitely a growing interest from outside the island. Meanwhile, Ikaria has also caught the eye of a few celebrities – such as Jamie Oliver and Marcus Pearce – who have been filming their shows on the island. Watch this space for Ikaria’s New Age!

THE EGG CAME FIRST

Once a crumbling nightclub, The Egg, Ikaria’s first and only multi-space for dance and wellness classes, was completely renovated in 2013 by German art director Katrin Gerner. Open from May to September to local and international teachers and therapists, it is a creatively decorated, airy and tranquil space, facing the sea. “Something very strong drew me here” Gerner says, “and I’ve realized that apart from the many gifts of the island itself and its people, individuals come here with the same target – to connect with their inner peace”.

VEDANTA ASPIOTI: ANCIENT MEETS THE NEW

Vedanta Aspioti, who is considered “an institution” in Ikaria’s healing community, is a trained therapist, medium, and self-help author who for 30 years has been leading the Power of Light retreats at Artemis Studios.

The location, right above Nas beach (a stunning, nudist-friendly beach with bright blue waters), by a beautiful lake and near the ruins of the Temple of Artemis, is not coincidental. “In recent years we are witnessing the harmonious marriage of the local’s archaic traditional way of life with New-Age inspired practices,” she says.

ROBYN WHATLEY KAHN: HEAR YOUR BODY
She once performed on stage alongside Frank Sinatra and Dean Martin, in the Gold Digger group. Now, Robyn Whatley Kahn, who settled on Ikaria a decade ago, teaches classes using the Body Talk System, Reiki and Deep Tissue Massage.

“Locals know I do therapia, and it has helped many here, so they send people to me,” she says. The American, known as Ourania (her middle name is Skye, and Greek for sky is ouranos), recently paid tribute to the island in her photography book, ‘Eyes on Ikaria’ – available on Amazon.


JOEY BROWN: RELEASE WRITER’S BLOCK

Also based on Ikaria, Belgian motivational writing coach Joey Brown combines meditation with writing summer workshops at various venues across Ikaria, helping writers to ‘unblock’, and feel inspired. “Most of my clients are foreigners, living stressful lifestyles,” she tells me. “Ikariotes are already so connected to the land, the sea, the elements – maybe they don’t have such needs.”

VICKY LAZOU: CHILD’s PLAY with clay
Vicky Lazou, a ceramic artist and teacher based in Athens – where she runs ‘To Ergastiri tou Pilou’ for children – travels to Ikaria every summer with her son and her husband (who hails from Ikaria). She has developed a technique which combines meditation with clay-molding, and it’s designed to help one’s “inner child” come out to play. She teaches group and one-to-one sessions to locals and visitors a few times each summer, announcing classes on Facebook. “The response has been very positive and encouraging,” she says. “Ikariotes love to express their creativity”.

 

 

Article By Alexia Amvrazi, as first published in Greece Is (www.greece-is.com).

 

anne specque, spa pioneer

Anne Specque is the Manager at the Grandre Bretagne Hotel’s Spa, which was the first to open in Greece (and among the first in Europe) in 2003. The French national came to Greece “for a few years” and ended up staying here until the present day, and as she reveals in this interview she is enamoured by Greek nature and all its bounty – the medicinal plants, which she uses for tea infusions, the hot springs and the sea are her favourites. The GB Spa is a luxurious wellness heaven for spa lovers wishing to enjoy pampering at its best, and is open both to hotel guests and outside clients.

“I came here for the opening of the Spa in 2003. Before that I worked in different places but they weren’t really spas, because spas as we know them only really started to develop over the last 12-14 years. Before that there were beauty centres, thalassotherapy or massage clinics. As our lifestyle changed, spas became a requirement of sorts in hotels, along with a gym area.

“The word spa means ‘Salute Per Acqua’ meaning ‘health via the water’; you definitely need have contact with the water. It’s not like thalassotherapy because that’s based on therapies with sea water. Especially if you are in a city, a spa is an oasis, a world of beauty and a place to rebalance the body and mind. The contact with water is so important before starting your treatment; when one arrives they may think they will relax with a body treatment, but this is not ideal – the ideal is to have contact with water, through a pool or sauna, and to relax and rebalance the nervous system, and to clear your energy from the outside world and its stress. When you swim, the water – especially or water here which is therapeutic, chlorine-free, enriched with ozone, oxygen and salt – melts away the tensions. Sauna is also very beneficial. Here we have various kinds of steam like one with eucalyptus, one with maracuja fruit, or other herbs. If the client doesn’t have time to use the spa facilities, we encourage them to at least use the steam facilities even for 10-15 minutes, because the steam temperature is higher than that of the body so it relaxes the muscles.

The GB Spa swimming pool, which is chlorine free and enriched with ozone, oxygen and sea salt. Grande Bretagne Anne Specque
The GB Spa swimming pool, which is chlorine free and enriched with ozone, oxygen and sea salt.

“A great deal has changed over the years in the spa world. One of the major changes is that nowadays many men visit spas – 15 years ago no men was seen in a beauty salon! Lots of (mainly businessmen) come for manicure-pedicure, grooming and massage therapies.

“Another change is that people like to combine the spa experience with healthy food – our clients care more about their nutrition. When guests talk with me they want to know what they should eat throughout the day, whether they should follow food fashions and such. I’m very health-oriented as a person and I am vegan but I don’t advocate others should be the same, as everyone has different needs. What I do propose to people nutritionally is that they follow the seasons; we have four seasons and even though it’s true that the environment has changed and it’s a little bit unstable, we have to keep the direction of eating the fruits and vegetables of each season and to add the things we prefer, whether it be herbs, or meats or eggs or cheese. I also believe people should try to eat local produce, as each country has to adapt its nutrition according to its own nature. I’m a true believer in the phrase ‘you are what you eat’.

“People are also travelling much more and are experimenting by trying more types of therapies. Ayurvedic treatments have become more popular in Europe – we’ve been offering Ayurveda for 12 years, but they’re not the most popular treatments as people still prefer body treatments (aesthetic and massage).

GB Spa Anne Specque interview
View from the naturally-lit GB Spa courtyard.

“Also there’s a return to natural therapies  – rather than using machines. Treatments done by hand, and beauty rituals like threading, which don’t make you lose elasticity in the skin, are very in demand recently.

“Every day is different for me – I don’t have a set routine! I adapt myself to the needs of the guests and it makes me very happy to offer them the best experience possible. The only standard thing is how we welcome the guests, and how we accommodate or advise them according to what they’d like to experience.

“Behind the scenes there is a great deal to do every day. From managing the various therapists and other staff like reception, cleaning, the life guard, etc, to making sure that everything is in its place throughout the day, to offering guests all the right suggestions and information based on their demands so they can leave here feeling wonderful. I always propose to guests to see the spa and what it can offer them, and we also suggest gift certificates that they can offer to a friend or partner.

The Grande Bretagne Spa Director, Anne Specque.
The Grande Bretagne Spa Director, Anne Specque.

“When selecting the therapists who work here, the most important thing I look for is for them to have at least a basic professional experience, but the most important thing is that they are passionate about what they do, and to continuously evolve in their skills. I like giving them the opportunity to develop their skills through practice and trainings – learning never ends, we need to constantly refresh our knowledge. We have an in-house trainer as well as a trainer who comes here from ESPA. The key focus is to keep a high quality of treatment and to have a really positive attitude in order to keep our team successful. The majority of our therapists are Greek, and many have roots in other countries too – Australia, Asia and Europe for example.

“In my time off, my passion is hot springs, and my favourite place is the island Ikaria in the northern Aegean. As it’s quite far away I don’t get the chance to go there very often so I go to nearer places on the mainland like Lagana, Xylokastro, or outside of Kammena Vourla or in wintertime to go to the sea I wear a special uniform for water (not a scuba diving suit) that goes from your neck to your feet and I don’t feel the cold water at all. I also like to gather plants from natural landscapes – I have around 50 types of herbs at home – and to make infusions. I cook according to the Hippocratic philosophy – to eat simply and to really enjoy my meal. For exercise, apart from swimming I love to cycle and visit archaeological sites as I’m fascinated by ancient places.”

relax & re-green!

In a mere two-hour drive from Athens, we zip past the sprawling seaside town of Akrata and start the steep ascent up curvy mountain roads, past resilient villages that take just minutes to drive through. The landscape is breathtaking, with a massive, imposing wall of mountain on one side, cobalt-blue sea on the other, and lush vegetation abounding.

As we reach the 3,000-year-old village of Seliana we follow directions until we come to a picturesque old church with a giant plane tree swaying beside it and then spot Re-Green’s unassuming entrance – a stone-built, square archway (a reference to the Mycenaean finds excavated on the land).  The place is run by Flery Fotiadou and her partner Christos Alexiou, Athenians worn down by the hard-core urban professional grind and who gladly packed it all in for a simpler life in the country.

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Guests come and go at Re-Green which is a kind of organic farm where people can stay while attending workshops on anything from yoga and botany to bush craft and eco-living but the pair sticks it out at the remote spot throughout the year, hit by extreme weather in winter, and never, ever slowing down on their land-tending mission and on keeping everything running smoothly. After finally finding the exact spot where they wanted to set up home, they studied permaculture to learn how to make the best of what they already had – a small variety of trees and plants – creating a beautiful stone guesthouse, a colorful food garden and several naturally built structures such as an outdoor Jacuzzi, kitchen and steam room.

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Of course studying skills like permaculture, organic and biodynamic faming, gardening and cob building are crucial for clueless city folk venturing to live the nature-based lifestyle, which is why Re-Green offers such courses encouraging others to follow in their steps.

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While briefly there I participated in a two hour singing class with French vocal artist and teacher Claire Bosse, whose group of French ladies of all ages warmly welcomed me to join in on vocal exercises and learning African polyphonic songs. I quickly got over my hot-faced awkwardness from making weird sounds and doing body-percussion on my (complete stranger) partner and plunged into the creative fun.

In their two weeks there the group was also studying Land Art with Aegina island-based teacher Yiannis Psalidakos and yoga with his French partner Laurieanne Felicite. The average day was made up of vegetarian (local, seasonal) communal meals, workshops and free time, the latter offering the chance to explore the rich landscape, visit numerous animals like Maya the fuzzy donkey, chickens, cats, ducks and dogs; spot medicinal herbs, edible flowers and juicy berries growing randomly; and walks down to the river or taking in stunning vistas of the sky changing colour while sitting on a park-bench at the edge of a cliff.

Relaxing in Re-Green’s accommodations is also easy, as the pair have done a great job with the interior decor, combining old traditional restored furnishings and decor items with natural ingredients creating an understated-luxury / country chic vibe, with large comfortable Queen size beds, fireplaces, modern bathrooms and comfy sofas added to the mix.
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Weeks after visiting Re-Green I still felt ebullient from the experience, perhaps because it’s more like a home than anything else, and definitely because its owners make it look so effortless but clearly work so hard to tend to every detail, making the experience really regenerating. The friendly, familial ambiance combined with creative and well-being oriented activities also makes this the kind of place that makes you want to go back, and I have promised myself, some time, I will.